Asthma at School or Daycare

Asthma at School or Daycare

You can help children learn how to better control symptoms of asthma by showing them how to recognize the warning signs of an asthma episode and develop a plan for managing an asthmatic episode. We teach children to control asthma by showing them how to take the right medication, at the right time, and in the right way. We also help them to know when their asthma is out of control and may require a visit to the doctors office.  Not everyone has the same symptoms or triggers, it is Different children have different triggers. We feel it is important to empower children to talk to teachers about asthma at school or daycare so they can stay active and give you moral...
Asthma Speaks

Asthma Speaks

  Do you know that asthma speaks? Everyone that has asthma has a story–one that touches everyone in their lives and impacts our whole society. According to the American Lung Association, in 2011 it was estimated that 25.9 million Americans had asthma; including 7.1 million children. Of those children, 4.1 million had an asthma attack that year[1]. Inside the general asthma population of the U.S., asthma occurs at a disproportionately higher rate among some ethnic populations. In particular, African American children, according to a 2008 survey of children 6 to 12 in Chicago elementary schools, are more than twice as likely to be diagnosed with asthma...

Asthma Action Planning

All people with asthma should have an asthma action plan, An asthma action plan (also called a management plan) is a written plan that you develop with your doctor to help control your asthma. The asthma action plan shows your daily treatment, such as what kind of medicines to take and when to take them. Your plan describes how to control asthma long term AND how to handle worsening asthma, or attacks. The plan explains when to call the doctor or go to the emergency room. If your child has asthma, all of the people who care for him or her should know about the child’s asthma action plan. These caregivers include babysitters and workers at daycare centers, schools, and camps. These caretakers can help your child follow his or her action plan. English: asthma-action-plan-english...

WHEN YOUR CHILD HAS BREATHING PROBLEMS

When your child has breathing problems, the information can get overwhelming. Here are a few tips on getting started with your child and asthma: Check with your doctor. If you suspect your child has asthma, have your child checked by your pediatrician or family doctor. Some simple tests can be conducted and your doctor will prescribe medicines. Develop an asthma action plan. If your child is diagnosed with asthma, the next step is to ask your doctor for an asthma action plan for your child. A good action plan addresses three main topics: What to do when your child is feeling fine What to do when your child is not feeling so good What to do for your child in an asthma emergency Share your asthma action plan. If your child is old enough to understand, explain the asthma action plan to your child. Share the asthma action plan with family members and caregivers at school, daycare, etc. Make sure all adult caregivers understand what to do and have the necessary emergency contact information (your phone number, the doctor’s phone number, etc.) Hang a copy of the asthma action plan in your home in a place where everyone can see it. Don’t worry–enact your plan. Encourage your child to share with you how he/she feels. Make your own observations. This will help you get a sense of when your child is doing well or starting to feel poorly. Partner with your doctor to communicate concerns, ask questions, adjust medicines, and get preventive care for your child. Partner with your child’s other caregivers to monitor how your child is doing. Following...